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Your searched on: skin cancer

Skin Cancer, Melanoma
Discusses melanoma, skin cancer that may be caused by too much sun exposure. Covers symptoms. Discusses how it is diagnosed. Offers prevention tips and covers skin self-exams. Discusses treatment options, including surgery and radiation therapy.

Skin Cancer, Nonmelanoma
Discusses basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, two types of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Covers causes and what increases your risk. Discusses early detection. Covers treatment choices, including chemotherapy and surgery. Offers prevention tips.

Skin Cancer Screening
Skin cancer can be cured if found and treated early. Your doctor may check your skin during your annual exam. Or your doctor may suggest a skin exam more often, especially if you have: Familial atypical mole and melanoma (FAM-M) syndrome. This is an...

Skin Cancer: Protecting Your Skin
Excessive exposure to the sun and its ultraviolet (UV) rays can cause skin cancer. You can reduce your risk for skin cancer by: Protecting your skin, and that of your family members, from UV radiation. Performing frequent skin self-examinations....

Laser Surgery for Skin Cancer
Laser surgery uses a wavelength of light that is focused in a narrow beam. This high-intensity light is used to shrink or destroy skin cancers or pre-cancers (actinic keratosis). With lasers, there is usually less bleeding, swelling, and scarring....

Cryosurgery for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer
Cryosurgery is the process of destroying a skin cancer (lesion) by freezing it with liquid nitrogen. Liquid nitrogen is applied to the lesion using a cotton applicator stick or an aerosol spray. The skin may first be numbed with a local anesthetic....

Excision for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer
Excision is the removal of a skin cancer along with some of the healthy skin tissue around it (margin). For this procedure, a local anesthetic is used to numb the area. After the cancerous area is removed, the incision is closed with stitches. If...

Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer: Comparing Treatments
Most nonmelanoma skin cancer can be cured if it is found and treated early. The goal of treatment is to completely remove the cancer. But the method of removal will differ depending on the experience of your doctor and the type of cancer you have....

Skin Cancer Prevention (PDQ): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI]
Cancer prevention is action taken to lower the chance of getting cancer. By preventing cancer, the number of new cases of cancer in a group or population is lowered. Hopefully, this will lower the number of deaths caused by cancer. To prevent new cancers from starting, scientists look at risk factors and protective...

Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI]
Skin cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the skin. The skin is the body's largest organ. It protects against heat, sunlight, injury, and infection. Skin also helps control body temperature and stores water, fat, and vitamin D. The skin has several layers, but the two main...

Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ): Screening - Patient Information [NCI]
Screening is looking for cancer before a person has any symptoms. This can help find cancer at an early stage. When abnormal tissue or cancer is found early, it may be easier to treat. By the time symptoms appear, cancer may have begun to spread. Scientists are trying to better understand which people are more likely to...

Curettage and Electrosurgery for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer
Curettage is the process of scraping skin with a spoon-shaped instrument (curette) to remove skin tissue. Electrosurgery is the burning of skin tissue with an electric current that runs through a metal instrument or needle. Electrosurgery may be...

Mohs Micrographic Surgery for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer
Mohs micrographic surgery involves removing a skin cancer one layer at a time and examining these layers under a microscope immediately after they are removed. This procedure allows for a close examination of each layer of skin to detect cancer...

Radiation Therapy for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer
Radiation therapy is used to destroy cancer cells. This procedure may require 15 to 30 visits to a facility with special equipment. Radiation therapy may be used in combination with other types of therapy to treat aggressive or recurrent skin...

Protecting Your Skin From the Sun
Covers possible effects of sun exposure, including sunburn and skin cancer. Explains UVA and UVB rays. Offers tips for children and adults on how much time to spend in the sun. Discusses protective clothing and sunscreen protection, including proper SPF.

Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI]
Note: Separate PDQ summaries on Skin Cancer Prevention, Skin Cancer Treatment, Genetics of Skin Cancer, and Levels of Evidence for Cancer Screening and Prevention Studies are also available. Interventions The only widely proposed screening procedure for skin cancer is visual examination of the skin, including both...

Skin Cancer Prevention (PDQ): Prevention - Health Professional Information [NCI]
Note: Separate PDQ summaries on Skin Cancer Screening, Skin Cancer Treatment, Genetics of Skin Cancer, and Levels of Evidence for Cancer Screening and Prevention Studies are also available. Individuals whose skin freckles, tans poorly, or burns easily after sun exposure are particularly susceptible to developing skin...

Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI]
There are three main types of skin cancer: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Melanoma. BCC and SCC are the most common forms of skin cancer and together are referred to as nonmelanoma skin cancers. This summary addresses the treatment of BCC and SCC of the skin and the related noninvasive lesion...

Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ): Genetics - Health Professional Information [NCI]
This executive summary reviews the topics covered in this PDQ summary on the genetics of skin cancer, with hyperlinks to detailed sections below that describe the evidence on each topic. Inheritance and Risk More than 100 types of tumors are clinically apparent on the skin; many are known to have familial and/or...

Basal Cell Skin Cancer: Should I Have Surgery or Use Medicated Cream?
Guides you through decision to treat low-risk basal cell skin cancer with surgery or medicated creams. Explains types of surgery and types of creams used. Covers benefits and risks of both. Includes interactive tool to help you make your decision.

Skin, Hair, and Nails
Provides links to information about skin, hair, and nail health. Includes info about skin cancer, hair loss, nail infections, acne, and skin protection.

Skin Changes
Discusses common skin changes and possible causes. Includes info on skin cancer. Includes home treatment tips for adults and children.

Actinic Keratosis
Discusses actinic keratosis (solar keratosis), a type of skin growth caused by sun exposure. Describes how skin will look and feel. Covers treatment options. Explains risk for squamous cell carcinoma (skin cancer). Offers prevention tips.

Skin Biopsy
Discusses why and how skin biopsies are done. Covers preparing for surgery and postsurgery risks. Explains how to interpret results, including abnormal results. Covers what affects test results.

Swollen Glands, Hernias, and Other Lumps Under the Skin
Discusses possible causes of swollen glands and other lumps under the skin. Covers bacterial and viral infections, noncancerous growths, hernias, aneurysms, and swelling caused by cancer. Includes an interactive tool to help you decide when to call a doctor.

Colostomy for Colorectal Cancer
After a surgeon has removed the diseased part of your bowel during an operation called a bowel resection, he or she will then sew the two healthy ends of your bowel back together. Sometimes the bowel tissue needs more time to heal before the...

Hair Loss From Cancer Treatment
Hair loss can be emotionally distressing. Not all cancer treatments cause hair loss, and some people have only mild thinning that is noticeable only to them. Your doctor will be able to tell you whether hair loss is an expected side effect of your...

Cancer: Home Treatment for Mouth Sores
A painful sore or ulcer inside your mouth may make it hard to eat and drink. Be sure to let your doctor know you are having mouth sores. You may need to have your medicines adjusted. And try some of the following home treatment measures to help ease...

Mastectomy (Removal of the Breast) for Breast Cancer
Discusses breast cancer surgery. Covers simple mastectomy, modified mastectomy, and radical mastectomy. Also discusses preventive mastectomy. Covers what to expect after surgery. Looks at risks. Links to info on breast reconstruction.

Breast Cancer: Should I Have Breast-Conserving Surgery or a Mastectomy for Early-Stage Cancer?
Guides you through decision about which surgery to have for early-stage breast cancer. Lists benefits and risks of both mastectomy and breast-conserving surgery. Includes interactive tool to help you make your decision.

Indoor Tanning: Is It Safe?
When people use a tanning bed or booth or a sunlamp to get a tan, it's called indoor tanning. Indoor tanning uses artificial ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) light, rather than sunlight, to tan the skin. People may feel that a tan makes...

Thinking About Bilateral Mastectomy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer
For years, studies have shown that for early-stage breast cancer, women who have breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) followed by radiation treatments live just as long as women who have mastectomy. This was good news for women who wanted to avoid...

Choosing a Prosthesis After Breast Cancer Surgery
Whether to wear a breast form (prosthesis) after breast surgery is a very personal decision. Some women feel better about themselves when their clothes fit just as they did before surgery. Other women feel comfortable just as they are. You can buy...

Breast Cancer: Should I Have Breast Reconstruction After a Mastectomy?
Guides through decision to have breast reconstruction after a mastectomy. Describes what options are available for breast reconstruction and how it is done. Covers benefits and risks. Includes an interactive tool to help you make your decision.

Breast Cancer: What Should I Do if I'm at High Risk?
Guides you through testing and treatment choices if you're at high risk for breast cancer. Covers extra checkups, medicines, and surgery. Lists reasons for and against for each option. Includes interactive tool to help you make your decision.

Lymphedema: Managing Lymphedema
Discusses steps to avoid swelling from lymphedema if you've had lymph nodes removed or had radiation, especially for cancer. Covers how to prevent infection. Includes exercise to help circulation. Includes care of affected arm or leg, and skin and nails.

Melanoma Treatment (PDQ): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI]
Melanoma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in melanocytes (cells that color the skin). The skin is the body's largest organ. It protects against heat, sunlight, injury, and infection. Skin also helps control body temperature and stores water, fat, and vitamin D. The skin has several layers, but...

Metastatic Melanoma
When melanoma spreads (metastasizes), it usually spreads first into nearby lymph nodes. It can also spread through the bloodstream. Distant metastases of melanoma typically are found in the skin, liver, lungs, bone, and brain. If the melanoma is on...

Lymph Node Removal (Lymphadenectomy) for Melanoma
Lymphadenectomy is surgery to remove lymph nodes. This surgery is done to see if cancer has spread to a lymph node. Some lymph nodes are located near the surface of the body, while others are deep in the abdomen or around organs, such as the heart...

Surgical Excision of Melanoma
Surgery to remove (excise) a melanoma removes the entire melanoma along with a border (margin) of normal-appearing skin. The width of the border of normal skin removed depends on the depth of the melanoma. More tissue, usually skin and fat, is also...

Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment (PDQ): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI]
Merkel cell carcinoma is a very rare disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the skin. Merkel cells are found in the top layer of the skin. These cells are very close to the nerve endings that receive the sensation of touch. Merkel cell carcinoma, also called neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin or trabecular...

Pruritus (PDQ): Supportive care - Patient Information [NCI]
Pruritus is an itchy feeling that makes you want to scratch your skin. It may occur without a rash or skin lesions. Pruritus sometimes feels like pain because the signals for itching and pain travel along the same nerve pathways. Scratching may cause breaks in the skin, bleeding, and infection. If your skin feels itchy...

Mycosis Fungoides (Including Szary Syndrome) Treatment (PDQ): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI]
Mycosis fungoides and Szary syndrome are diseases in which lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) become malignant (cancerous) and affect the skin. Normally, the bone marrow makes blood stem cells (immature cells) that become mature blood stem cells over time. A blood stem cell may become a myeloid stem cell or a...

Tissue Flap Surgery for Breast Reconstruction
Discusses breast reconstruction surgery done after mastectomy. Covers two ways of doing the surgery: pedicle flap and free flap. Looks at types of flap surgery: TRAM, latissimus dorsi, DIEP, SIEA, TUG, and gluteal free. Covers what to expect after surgery and risks.

Exercises After Mastectomy
After breast surgery (mastectomy), you may feel some pain going down your arm. Your shoulder and arm may be stiff and hard to move. You may also have some loss of feeling there. The basic exercises described here will help you start moving your arm....

Living With More Than One Health Problem
Many people have more than one long-term (chronic) health problem. You may be one of them. For example, you may have high blood pressure and diabetes, or you may have high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart failure. When you have more than one...